LoV-Write

Book Blurbs (Coffee: Epic of a Commodity by E. H. Jacob)

Coffee: The Epic of a Commodity by E.H. Jacob (1935), translated by Eden and Ceder Paul (1998) is an economic history of a popular product. Jacobs begins with a story about some Arab monks who observed the energized manner of goats, and from these goats discovered coffee and it’s regenerative effects. From this Islamic monastery, Jacobs traces the life of coffee as a commodity until 1931, when trade forces compelled the Brazilian government to burn vast quantities of coffee.

epic of a commodity

epic of a commodity

In the post script, Jacobs writes that, “Much that I had intended to include has slipped through the meshes of my net, because its inclusion would have confused the general impression, and because it was a refractory element. Not every interesting fact can be woven into a comprehensive survey like the present.” (pg 283).

Jacobs, E.H. Coffee: The Epic of a Commodity. 1935. Trans. Eden & Cedar Paul. New York: Skyhorse Publishing, 2015. Print.

Book Blurbs (Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain)

In the Preface to Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly, Anthony Bourdain writes, “What I set out to do was write a book that my fellow cooks and restaurant lifers would find entertaining and true. I wanted it to sound like me talking,” (xv). Throughout, Bourdain maintains this conversational style, and takes the reader on a day trip through his experiences with food, with cooking, drug abuse, and a number of the little things that formed the Chef he grew into. Kitchen Confidential

 

Bourdain, Anthony. Kitchen Confidential: Adventures in the Culinary Underbelly. Updated ed. New York, NY: Harper Collins, 2007. Print.

Book Blurbs (Evangelpreneur by Josh Tolley)

In Evangelpreneur (2015) Josh Tolley discusses entrepreneurship in the context of Christianity, and defines an Evangelpreneur as “someone who lives his or her life with the focus of spreading God’s kingdom and will through the empowerment He created in free enterprise” (4).by Josh Tolley

The purpose of the book, writes Tolley, is to “look at why I believe being an Evangelpreneur is God’s purpose for believers and how we start down that path” (5). First, Tolley outlines the purpose of entrepreneurship and free enterprise, and offers practical advice with business realities. Next, he he discusses the lies that keep people from entering business, and outlines the risks and benefits of entrepreneurship.

Tolley finishes Evangelpreneur with sections on doing business, doing church, and doing life. Throughout the book, Tolley uses biblical and modern examples to elaborate his point, while discussing more current issues of debt within Churches, and the importance (and inseparability) of Faith in business.

An educational and convicting read, it is written in a way to encourage and admonish Christian readers, while still being accessible to non-believers.

Tolley, Josh. Evangelpreneur: How Biblical Free Enterprise can Empower Your Faith, Family, and Freedom. Dallas: BanBella Books, inc., 2015. Print.

What Americans can learn from other food cultures

lovwrite:

Food and culture are wonderful things.

Originally posted on ideas.ted.com:

Food feeds the soul. To the extent that we all eat food, and we all have souls, food is the single great unifier across cultures. But what feeds your soul?

For me, a first-generation Korean-American, comfort food is a plate of kimchi, white rice, and fried Spam. Such preferences are personally meaningful — and also culturally meaningful. Our comfort foods map who are, where we come from, and what happened to us along the way. Notes Jennifer 8. Lee (TED Talk: Jennifer 8. Lee looks for General Tso), “what you want to cook and eat is an accumulation, a function of your experiences — the people you’ve dated, what you’ve learned, where you’ve gone. There may be inbound elements from other cultures, but you’ll always eat things that mean something to you.”

In much of China, only the older generations still shop every day in the wet market, then go home and cook traditional…

View original 1,726 more words

Kickstarter Campaign

I’ve started a Kickstarter campaign to bolster my publication expenses. Since it’s pushing the one year mark, I thought this would be a suitable way to herald the full turn around the sun.

Here’s the Kickstarter page: https://www.kickstarter.com/projects/lovwrite/publication-past-and-future

Suspense Excercise II

Howard Dow Jones commanded his own tank. He had dreamed of commanding a tank since he was a child, and his dream became real only after a lifetime of hard work. At twenty-seven years old, Howard Dow Jones left his wife and children in Georgia, and went overseas to fight in the same wars that had inspired him to serve. His children, a little boy named Edward and little girl Bernice, loved their father and had dreams of their own: Bernice dreamed of being a pilot while her brother dreamed of commanding his own tank just like his father. But their father will not see them pursue their dreams. Howard Dow Jones will not see them grow, or marry, or graduate, but will return from the war to find his home burned down and his wife and children cinders.

Suspense Excercise I

This story will end with a boom 100 words from now:

We were working on the set for Macbeth, discussing “The Scottish play” and superstitions when our new-hire, Mac, said he didn’t believe in curses. “Hell,” he said, “gods, demons, all that is bullshit.” And he began insulting the superstitions and ended saying: “May those little dreams, the spirits, all meet the same fate as that wretched king Macbeth.” When he said this, the men hanging drops shouted “Watch out! A rack is falling!” We all ran, but Mac tripped and fell on the microphone. And that pole stuck in his chest? That is the boom.

Observation

“I’d like them to understand what it feels like to attain the child’s dream of running one’s
own pirate crew-what it feels like, looks like and smells like in the clatter and hiss of a big city
restaurant kitchen.” From Kitchen Confidential by Anthony Bourdain
A strangely accurate reduction of restaurant work, and an explanation as to why I insist on joining the crews of Food Services.

A Coffee Bean

I’m working in a coffee shop.

This coffee shop serves resource sensitive and environmentally conscious coffee which has been planted, grown, harvested, roasted, and transported with utmost care and delicacy. This tedious process is to ensure a high quality cup of coffee for people to enjoy for a nominal fee.

The shop serves excellent coffee, but I’ll always have a soft spot for the back-burner by-the-pot coffee of those 24-hour restaurants I grew up with, and those cheap, off-brand coffees that come in two-pound tubs: those “blue-collar” coffees of the Safeway aisle and the labor-class bulk buys.

These coffees speak in softer, more familiar tones. They call with light voices through the mild musk of ground beans and thumb a milky nose at the “finer blends” through swirls of milk and sugar.

They are crasser blends, but they are, I think, a part of my history that time will not weaken, because I have memories of coffee scented music and hazy late nights that will ever remain as coffee stain on my life’s white cloth.

A Writer

Am I a writer?

I haven’t published in over a month, my journal is out of date, my reading neglected, and my next novels languish as half-written sentences and outlines.

Yet I have the gall to tell people I meet that I am a writer.

I give the usual excuses for not placing pen to paper and not opening the computer: I’ve been busy lately; I’m working full time and moving; and, I do think about my stories all the time.

Am I a writer if I neglect my writing in favor of thinking?

I’ve heard that Milton dictated Paradise Lost and never inked a quill; that Joyce spent days thinking over a single sentence; that Austen thought works into being that are subtle critiques of her society. They are called writers, so maybe a Writer is someone who cares for their language and thinks before they pen.

I wonder if they feared to disturb the Universe?

Am I writer if I let life and fear prevent me from writing?

When faced with the uncertainty of the future I find my pen quaking and futility sprawling across my pages. The Universe is far too vast to be disturbed by the symbols of my small ideas, and the marks a mortal leaves are faint, washable things.

Even so, after a while I find my muse nudging me back to the pages and urging me to record her stories and poetries, and to form a linguistic image from the material granted me.

“Silence is a call to reflect” she tells me, “neglect is a chance to care, and forgetfulness the moment to remember.”

I am flawed and inconsistent, but I am a writer.

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